Reading List – 2019:

Reading challenge – I

To whatever gods inspired this list, I am forever indebted.
  1. The Thing Around Your Neck – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  2. Americanah – Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie
  3. Questions For Ada – Ijeoma Umebinyuo
  4. Half Of A Yellow Sun – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  5. Things Fall Apart – Chinua Achebe
  6. We Should All Be Feminists – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  7.  Born A Crime – Trevor Noah
  8. Dear Ijeawele – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  9. Homegoing – Yaa Gyasi
  10. Nervous Conditions – Tsitsi Dangarembga
  11.  12 Rules Of Life – Jordan Peterson *
  12. Woman At Point Zero – Nawal El Saadawi
Progress:

– Currently reading ‘The Thing Around Your Neck’ – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

The Brave Mister

 

Brave Mister
photo credit @ownherworld

 

I come in many shapes and sizes.

To some, I am a man of charisma; the kind that stifles fear and electrifies the will.

To others, I am the biggest loser; the man with a balding sense of humour.

To the art of words, I am her brave Mister; the fool that tried to tame her and failed.

I do not claim that Poetry loves me in the same manner, but tis the love Shakespeare proclaimed.

A love affair with the sublime that only ends in one way: when the writer stops writing.

I was three when I first met my muse — my Juliette of poetry?

Sparks flew when she spoke in metaphors and I in broken vows and sentences.

I made a mockery of myself; what with the diaper and the lack of sophistication?

So I strengthened my acquisition with the world; I learnt the language of Men and Bots.

I went to pre-school.

I learnt to colour in between the lines to impress her. I was fervently in love with my muse, but I could not express her. I fell sick; my muse ignored me still.

From an early age to adolescent, I buried myself in television. I let the ambient box sing me to sleep. I let it erase my talents. I dragged through life and death — then back through life. I did things I would never trade my breath for — like learning to dance with both feet. The magic was missing. There was no thrill, no spunk.

Till I read ‘My Black Is Beautiful’ by Yolanda Mabuto.

If admitting that I cried means I’ll be stripped of my right to be a man, then set me free. I was revitalised of an energy I once knew; I was alive again. And I felt my muse blink.

Ever collapse to the sensation of being home after a long trip?

I felt the same; I felt the rush of belonging to something bigger than self — of belonging to Juliette.

I read more and she spoke a little louder. We dined over Jane Austen’s passages, laughed like children in Chuck Lorre’s ‘Vanity Cards’ and survived horrors in Stephen King’s ‘Nightmares and Dreamscapes’.

The more I marched over the terrains of literature, the closer I came to my muse.

Soon, we became one; we became night and day.

And with a kiss, she vanished.

She said I was ready.

Ready for what?

Ready to write.